Book Review: I Owe You One (Sohpie Kinsella)

Fixie Farr lives within a dynamic family: Family First as the family motto goes.

Mum is as peaceful and loving as they come. She’s the supermom that you could only ever dream to become.

Dad was bigger than life before he passed away, leaving an empty hole and an empty chair at the dinner table. He was the man in charge in their family business (Farr’s) but when he passed, Mum worked her tail off to keep it thriving.

Jake, big brother, is a posh, temperamental achiever who strives for bigger, better, more.

Power. Profit. Potential.

With the power and money to go big, he constantly undermines Fixie at every turn and makes changes to the store and to their lives that could potentially bring them under.

Nicole, the yoga guru, the animal personality wizard and one terrified of things such as her marriage and the coffee maker. Ambitious and flaky, you love her and hate her. She isn’t the perfect older sister but she’s there and there’s hope in that.

In a family such as this, when does the line blur between putting family first and putting yourself last?

Fixie the fixer has a flaw. She can’t but fix things and most the times it ends up going south. Ever since she was ten, she was madly in love with a boy named Ryan Chalker. He was a star, bound for Hollywood, bound to make waves and watch the world follow behind. Naturally, he and Jake became the best of friends and waves turned into tsunamis and in her eyes, Fixie could never compare. She was a failure. She failed at skating, she failed at her own catering business, she fails to see the flaws in Ryan and she keeps her head down with the family business.

I draw breath, telling myself that this time I’ll do it; this time I’ll really have my say. But as I look up at Jake’s intimidating face, it happens again. My nerve collapses. The ravens have started flapping around me.

Enter Sebastian Marlowe. Founder and CEO of ESIM (Ethical Sense Investment Management). He has woodland eyes and the cure for the ravens but when they meet in unexpected circumstances, they later wish life could be reversed.

You can’t go back in time and do life a different way. That’s not how it works.

When Fixie’s world comes crumbling down, she doesn’t have the strength to carry on. Where Sebastian was once a stronghold, he is no longer and Fixie is left to fend for herself. Family First.

But when does Family First cross a line? And why should Fixie always come last?

I gave this book 3 stars (3.5 stars but I didn’t feel like I should round this one up to 4 stars). It wasn’t a bad book but it wasn’t a 4-star book either. It was funny, cute and quirky. I was willing to stay up late finishing it but once done, realized I would have rather had my sleep and finished the next day. I wouldn’t recommend it per se but I do feel like it would be a great beach read; something you fly through quickly.

I got frustrated a lot at Fixie because of the allowances she gave other people, especially her brother. The brow-beatings she got on a constant basis were annoying and you really just wanted to smack them all. Mum disappears for a long time and you truly feel the absence (which I’m sure is intentional but it feels very obvious that she needed to be out of the plot to make it work). The ending was tied up quickly with a nice little bow but at least it left you happy.


Thank you to NetGalley, to Random House Publishing Group and to Sophie Kinsella for the Advanced Copy in exchange for an honest review. Looking forward to future books!

(You can find more reviews on my Goodreads page and my Instagram page)

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Book Review: Beasts of Extraordinary Circumstance (Ruth Emmie Lang)

Beasts of Extraordinary Circumstance

Beasts of Extraordinary Circumstance by Ruth Emmie Lang

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I looked over at Weylyn, who was still leaning out the window, blinking heavily as rain ran into his eyes. A bitter smile crossed his face, as if he knew I was watching him; as if he were answering the question that was on the tip of my tongue: Did you do this?



It all started in Holbrook, Michigan (1968) when little baby Weylyn Grey made his way into the world. It was June 29th and with his first breath came a snow storm. In just a few minutes, six inches or more had fallen and the world was changed forever.

The child turned one eye on me, then opened the other like a backward wink. His irises were molten pools of solder that had not yet set, and for a moment I thought I could see a fire behind them, keeping them liquid.

Weylyn Grey was orphaned at a young age and raised by wolves. Through extraordinary circumstances, he meets the lovely Mary Penlore and unknowingly changes the course of their lives forever. Through many trials and many unexplainable storms later, he lives many lives and meets many people. He becomes the happy owner of a magical horned pig named Merlin. Together they stop tornadoes, hurricanes and occasionally a rainstorm or two (though you won’t ever find Weylyn taking credit).

Weylyn quickly realizes the dangers he brings upon those close to him and decides it best to seclude himself, to run back to the wolves. He tried to make the best of life, tried to love but when that love came crashing down in yet another (deadly) pile of snow, he vanishes. Anyone who knew him could tell you, reader, that you hope he reappears. You hope you do not have to go through life without a Weylyn Grey in the midst of it.

As he bent down and scratched her behind the ears like she was a harmless dog, I felt a sadness more acute than anything I’d ever felt before. Weylyn Grey didn’t belong in my world. He belonged in theirs, and there was nothing I could say to convince him otherwise.

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Thank you Ruth Emmie Lang, for Weylyn. Thank you for opening your mind and creating a character so real, so loveable as Weylyn that it breaks your heart knowing he’s not real.

I don’t know. I’m beginning to think maybe he is… somewhere. He’s too incredible not to be. ♥️

If you have not yet picked up this book, you really really should. It’s magical and you will never forget Weylyn or many of the others in this beautiful story.

PHOTO CREDIT: @lifeinlit (instagram)

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Book Review: An Anonymous Girl (Greer Hendricks & Sarah Pekkanen)

“The title of the project is entered on the blank screen of the computer: The Temptation of Infidelity: A Case Study.

The hypothesis: Thomas is an unrepentant adulterer.
There is only one subject: My husband.
There is only one variable: You.

Jessica, please don’t fail this test. It would be a pity to lose you.”

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – 

Jessica – known to friends and family as Jess – is a girl who swims in a world of regret. The shadows of her past, her lies, her secrets, they haunt her. Days go by where she is void of any memories of what she did and then something reminds her, bringing her to the brink of collapse.

Jess is no stranger to the struggle of providing for herself in New York. She works as a freelance makeup artist for BeautyBuzz and barely scrapes by. That is until she learns of Dr. Shields’ study. She isn’t invited in but that doesn’t stop her. She finds a way in, as she always does. The study pays a substantial amount of money. A study on morality, how hard could that be? Jess has the opportunity to make a quick $500 easy but at what cost to her and her family? Little does she know that her cracked and warped world is about to twist in unimaginable ways.

“Sometimes a simple gift is actually a vessel utilized to issue a warning shot.” 

What Did I Think? Keep Reading!

Book Review: Her One Mistake (Heidi Perks)

“You know you can trust me.”

Six words. One moment in time. Two lives changed forever.

Harriet is a mother like many that is nervous to let someone else care for her child. When her best friend, Charlotte, promises her all will be fine, she nervously trusts her friend to take care of her baby girl. She trusts that her daughter will return home safely, that surely her good friend would never be careless with someone else’s child. Harriet pulls up to her house to find a world of her nightmares awaits; Alice is gone. Police have nothing. And this eerily connects to a previous child kidnapping.

or does it?

Something more sinister is going on here that will rock everyone’s world. Someone goes missing. Someone dies. And someone loses the life as they know it for better or for worse. The author cleverly leaves the decision up to you. Do you walk away from this book feeling relieved? Or do you walk away feeling unresolved?


This book was 4 stars for me. It had delicious twists and turns and one epic, jaw-dropping shocker. It was better than I had anticipated and I fully recommend reading! As for what I didn’t like? I felt the ending did not quite match those twists and turns felt throughout the book but still good and worthy of a 4-star review. I love that she didn’t tie it all up in the end with a nice, neat bow however it still left me with a feeling that it could’ve been so much more. I’m not knocking the author because it’s clear she is more than capable. The ending just didn’t fit the book for me but it was definitely worth the read. If you read other reviews, some absolutely love the ending as not everyone has the same taste.

My only other issue is the title. I still cannot quite figure out what her title is referring to but don’t let that steer you off course. It still fits, but not quite as well as one would like.

Thank you NetGalley and Gallery Books for this advanced copy in exchange for an honest review.

Book Review: The Ash Family (Molly Dektar)

The Ash Family: A Novel

The Ash Family: A Novel by Molly Dektar

My rating: 4 of 5 stars


Three days or the rest of your life

“Come, my soul, and let us try, for a little season, every burden to lay by, come and let us reason.”

Berie wants none of it. At 19 years old, she doesn’t want her life. Not her college. Not even her boyfriend or her mother. However, till she meets Bay at a bus station, she has no idea what life actually holds for her and if she even wants what it has to offer. Bay hands her a life unexpected but with one condition: three days or the rest of your life.

“What if I stay longer than three days but want to leave after?” I said.

“Why would you want to leave, when you’ll have more freedom here than anywhere else?” he said.


But at what point does freedom become captivity and when you’ve pushed the world away, how does one escape?

And at what point, when does one no longer want to escape?

– – – – – – – – – – – –

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Book Review: The Daughter (Lucy Dawson)

The Daughter

The Daughter by Lucy Dawson

My rating: 4 of 5 stars


Too many secrets. Too many lies. The past is catching up to Jessica and there’s not much more she can take…

17 years ago:

Something every mother fears has happened to Jess’s daughter, Beth. It destroys Jess and starts to unravel all the tightly woven deceptions she’s kept hidden for so many years. Fearful it would all come crumbling down, she ran.

Present day:

Happily married, new life, beautiful toddler in arms, Jess starts having bizarre things happen to her. Terrifyingly, the past shows itself to be a force of nature and that there’s no escape. Someone wants her to pay, someone wants her to feel pain. The past is here and this time, there’s no running. But at what grave cost?

– – – – –

3.5 stars, rounded up. I debated between 3 and 4 stars and decided this was a book I didn’t love, didn’t hate, wouldn’t recommend as in “man you’ve gotta read this book!” BUT wouldn’t want to discourage others from reading! So enjoy it if you do. I did!


Thank you, Lovelies!






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Book Review: Nine Perfect Strangers (Liane Moriarty)

Nine Perfect Strangers

Nine Perfect Strangers by Liane Moriarty

My rating: 4 of 5 stars


“The lowest point of your life can lead to the highest.”

A health resort. A goddess, once a leader in a man’s world, now a divine leader to worlds unknown. A group of nine strangers longing for a difference in themselves, expectations low with results they could never have dreamed up.

Continue reading Book Review: Nine Perfect Strangers (Liane Moriarty)

Book Review: When We Found Home (Susan Mallery)

When We Found Home

When We Found Home by Susan Mallery

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

When We Found Home tells the tale of a family who was split apart before they ever knew one another existed. The story begins with Malcolm meeting Delaney where she works, having carefree fun flirting and is suddenly thrust into her world when something happens to Keira, his half sister. To understand the book better, here are the main characters:

Malcolm, a good-looking executive with a past that would wipe you off your feet. A calm, caring man with a big heart and an empty brain when it comes to raising 12-year-old Keira, his half sister. You’ll be in love with him from start to finish.

Keira, a sassy little lass. Way too street-smart and far too scarred from the loneliness and heartache she’s had to endure. She’s a tough one and she helps round out her half-brother’s very distrusting opinions of the newest half-sister, Callie.

As Malcolm put it, “you’re all attitude and no backbone.” Callie is a fiery one, she is. She’s strong and witty but don’t be fooled by her very thin armor. She’s terrified. A convicted felon made heiress to an empire overnight.

Then we have Delaney. Oh my dear smart, beautiful, ambitious, frustrating girl.

Continue reading Book Review: When We Found Home (Susan Mallery)

Book Review: Good Me, Bad Me (Ali Land)

Good Me, Bad MeGood Me, Bad Me by Ali Land

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

 

 

Up eight. Up another four. The door on the right.
➖➖➖➖➖➖
The playground.
That’s what she called it.
Where the games were evil, and there was only ever one winner.
When it wasn’t my turn, she made me watch.
A peephole in the wall.
Asked me afterwards. What did you see, Annie?
What did you see?
••••••••••••••••••••• Continue reading Book Review: Good Me, Bad Me (Ali Land)